Pacing Guide

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New Member

Pacing Guide

I teach middle school math and I am way behind the pacing guide. They tell us to add more rigor, teach open response questions, etc. but there is no time. We don't do many games/activities.

 

My students have to take an assessment in two weeks. I will only have 3-4 days to begin teaching one of the units on the test. The other teacher is on about the same pace as me so I know I am not going too slow but it still feels that way. :(

 

I'm planning out next week and my kids are taking a quiz on Thursday. I am not sure if I should start the new unit on Friday so we have 4 days to learn new content before the test OR if I should spend Friday practicing open response questions. I want my kids to do more open response practice (which they need) but I worry about the pacing.

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PowerSchool Team
PowerSchool Team

Re: Pacing Guide

Hi @zackxoxo !

 

I believe every teacher struggles with dilemmas like yours towards the end of the school year. Teachers always have more they can teach then there's time for and considerable challenges this spring definitely impacted teachers ability to get to all of it.

If this assessment is a standardized one that you cannot change, I'd encourage you to brainstorm with your colleague on what you might be able to do to touch upon a few of the big broad concepts in the new unit for a day or two and then also spend a day or two working on open response questions. I don't believe you specified what age group you are teaching but as a trained secondary educator is look at the curriculum you have yet to cover. Are there ideas you can cover and then ask the kids to predict what might happen next or as a result of what they learned already? This type of open ended question helps them draw on what they know and draw conclusion based on it. This sort of reasoning and structuring responses will help you see their critical thinking abilities and the conclusions they draw. After teaching this sort of response, you can spend a smaller amount of time explaining what did or didn't happen and why. Using a method like this you can teach a small amount of new content, help construct open ended responses with evidence from what they learned, and then reteach anything they didn't misunderstood or saw differently. Sometimes even if their predictions aren't accurate, you can see how insightful some of your students are. Does this example make sense? 

If you want more ideas, maybe respond back with what grade level and content matter you are addressing. Hope to hear what you and your colleague decided to do and how it went!